Aug28

2 Comments

Recently I have been trying to get back to my research to both tie up loose ends and tighten up the documentation. My hope is that another go-through will help me notice some clues I may have missed in prior passes. In particular, I’d like to get my Irish half of the tree back a generation or 4.

Egan Family, Creggan, Kings, IrelandEven though I’m only 2 or 3 generations removed from Ireland and even with some excellent cousin contacts in Ireland to help answer questions and discuss things with, those parts of my trees could use some real leafing up.

Peeking at my family in the 1901 Irish census, I again noticed my 2x-great-grandmother living with them. She is 88 years old at the time and (unsurprisingly) is not there in the 1911 census. I realized I had never looked for her death certificate! I had been unsuccessful in finding her marriage earlier in time, so thought perhaps I’d get lucky and find her maiden name included.

With a name like Mary Egan, finding the right record can easily be a daunting task. But, with some calculated searching of the Civil Registration Indexes in the correct parish I came up with a likely death record for her in 1902. I faxed in a request for a photocopy to GRO Ireland (only 4) using the free online Hellofax service, and Voila! I received the certificate via email within a week or so.

It is definitely the correct death certificate, as it mentions the Townland and my great-grandfather as the informant. Sadly, no maiden name was included. (I didn’t really expect it as it would be atypical I think.)

Mary Egan, Cause of Death Detail, 1902, Creggam, Ferbane, IrelandBut, her cause of death is startling: “Severe burns, 6 weeks, no medical attendant.”, and her death was registered about 5 weeks later than the event.

Jeepers. I suppose open hearths and aged people are not a good mix. I wonder if anyone else has any interesting stories of having been surprised by how people have died?

Is gaire cabhair Dé ná an doras.

UPDATE: As usual, after I received this certificate I forwarded a copy to one of my cousins in Ireland who is a 1st cousin from my Dad’s generation. He recalled that when younger, his mother told him that the family’s thatched house burned down. So, once again – it pays to keep in touch with family AND talk to them about your findings!


Death Certificate, Mary Egan, 1902, Creggan, Kings, Ireland

2 Comments

  • avatar

    Comment by Anne — August 28, 2015 @ 6:15 pm

    Yikes! What an awful way to go!

  • avatar

    Comment by John — August 31, 2015 @ 9:01 pm

    Yes. I just updated the post: my cousin Kieran recalled that his mother told him the family house burned down. He wasn’t sure what time period that was, but seems like a likely connection!

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Leave a comment

I've had to temporarily add a math Capcha since Akismet has been flaky. Put on yer thinkin' caps. * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.