• Ireland
  • Sep25

    4 Comments

    I have been helping a friend lately by looking to see what I could put together for her family tree. Luckily for her, almost immediately a torrent of records began to pour from the online coffers, so the tree began to fill up quite nicely.

    As is often the case, there are a few records that may be for parallel persons of similar name, so definitely some work to do on locking those down as properly vetted and assessed.

    XBut, in the short run I found an interesting thing: both her great grandfather, and his father both seemed to have served in the Fighting 69th volunteer infantry – although the elder was before the Civil War, and the younger in World War I.

    While looking at information for what appears to be the younger Francis Kearney’s stay in a a “National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers”, I found something slightly puzzling.

    His history at the home lists him as being “Admitted” on May 4, 1925, and then on Oct 31, 1926 his Cause of Discharge is “Dropped.”

    Francis Kearney Military Home Record DetailThe images for these records come in pairs of pages, and I quickly noticed that the next fellow’s record has many entries for “Discharged” and “Transferred”.

    Anyone out there in the genealogosphere have any knowledge on the term “Dropped” in this context? Hmm.

    Record Citation:

    “United States National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866-1938,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-21051-37678-11?cc=1916230&wc=MMRT-VYX:n30335972 : accessed 25 Sep 2013), Togus, Maine > Register no. 18000-19499 > image 262 of 771.

  • Sep12

    No Comments

    For those researching family in Ireland, the book Illustrations, Historical and Genealogical of King James’s Irish Army List, 1689 might be useful in your trek back in time. (In an 1861 updated second edition, by John D’Alton.)

    The AskAboutIreland site says of the work:

    The work contains a vast wealth of family history, including information outlining the lineage, honours and achievements of families connected with Ireland, either through birth, rank, title or alliance. As many of the sources used in compiling the two volumes are now lost they stand as a highly valuable tool for Irish family research.

    Visit their site for a bit more description of the content and links to PDF versions of the two volumes.

    You can also find variously formatted versions of the books on Archive.org. Click here for one version although the header pages differ from the Ask About Ireland versions, so I’m unsure if they are earlier versions or some other form.

    But, the Archive.org version does have searchable text formats, so you can look for the surnames you hope to find more easily…

  • Aug5

    No Comments

    This weekend I made my first visit to a Familysearch Family History center to view some records in the record set “Ireland, Landed Estate Court Files, 1850-1885.” While the index to the set is available anywhere, the images are viewable only at a center and I believed that there were some mentions in it  for two of my 2nd great-grandfathers.

    While following up later, I was looking into the name of the Kings County Barony mentioned to verify I had the right location, and happened upon an interesting reference in “Accounts and Papers of the House of Commons” (1871) – a “General Alphabetical Index to the Towns and Townlands of Ireland.”

    Enjoy.

  • Jul24

    No Comments

    No time to post much lately, and have one long post about a research project that I want to write up properly, so…. enjoy this Discover Ireland advertisement in the meantime.

  • May28

    No Comments

    I have been on the trail of trying to find a lost Aunt in my family for several years. She was my grandmother’s daughter, born in Ireland and likely emigrated to New York as a teenager, many years after my Gran did.

    I have a much longer post in the making on this search and some possible good fortune – but I am in need of some help with one thing. I have not been able to discern what the handwriting says over the typewritten information on the following image.

    Lizzie Jennings Ellis Island record - handwriting in question

    Click to Enlarge.


    Does anyone out there have an idea of what it might be? Some quick context: this is a possible record for the Aunt I am seeking, and this part of the emigration lists the name and address of the person she is joining in the US.

    I have not found the “Father, Thomas Jennings” in question in NY at the time in censuses, directories, etc. BUT, this address is where my Gran lived in the 1920 census. No evidence of anyone named Jennings living at that location found yet.

    I am not sure the text handwritten in is anything special, but I am not getting anything from it but the initial “D…” and probably the second word is “to.” I’m wondering if it might be some common notation other researchers might recognize right off the bat.

    The original record on the Ellis Island site can be found here.