• New York
  • Jun28

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    Found when trolling old newspapers for hints of my Tierneys in New York City and environs. I can claim no relation to this affectionate young man, but the writer’s style is razor sharp!

    John Tierney is a very affectionate young man.

  • Jun21

    2 Comments

    I have been trying to figure out what the entry is in the Occupation column for my wife’s great-grandfather in the 1940 census. The Industry is clearly “City Subway” and the Occupation sort of looks like “Track-Man” but the way the letters are formed in the first syllable I have a feeling that is not what it is supposed to say.

    For reference, here is a link to the full 1940 census page on Ancestry.

    He was listed as a Signalman for the Long Island Railroad in the 1930 census, if that’s any clue. Anyone with an idea?


    1940 Census Detail for Michael Duffy Job

  • May2

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    Little Chapel on the River: A Pub, a Town and the Search for What Matters MostLittle Chapel on the River: A Pub, a Town and the Search for What Matters Most by Gwendolyn Bounds

    My rating: 3 of 5 stars

    Little Chapel on the River is a community study of even tempo and simple observation. I appreciated the author’s reserve in description of both place and people.

    Over time she lets their actions and words paint the picture of a group of people whose intersection is not in their own backgrounds or personalites, but in their desire, no, their longing for a place to step out of life for a bit to contemplate and discuss what passes by on river and road.

    I had some difficulty in rating the book, though – I would give it a 3.5 stars if possible. My only complaint was that I found the stitching of the author’s passages to the life around the Little Chapel a little abrupt. I confess this was mainly an issue for me in the beginning of the book when I had not yet bought into the atmosphere and people of Guinan’s.

    Perhaps it is just that I found the apt simplicity of the writing at odds with the events of 9/11 that led to her journey up the river – but I suppose that a return to basics does make sense in retrospect and any other method would have run the risk of overexposing the image too early on.

    I would certainly recommend this to someone looking for a story of people and community.

    I actually found Little Chapel mentioned in a genealogy thread for people while searching for info on the Guinan family in my great-great-grandmother’s part of the tree. My Guinans happened to come from near Birr where the family in the book came from – so I thought I’d see if I could learn anything from the book.

    While I did not find too much info on the Ireland side of the story, I’m glad I found the book.

    View all my reviews

  • Mar2

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    My grandmother Marie Simanek emigrated from Predmir, Czechoslovakia to New York in 1922, then returned home in 1926 to ask permission to marry my grandfather Joseph Vanac.

    In this photo she is returning to New York – with approval to marry! (She is the upper left-most woman in the rear. Click on the photo for a larger image.)
    It was taken in September, 1926 on the S.S. George Washington.

    Group Photo - SS George Washington, circa 1926

    The photo as a whole is one of my favorites, but the ladies at the bottom are my favorite favorite.

    Group Photo Crop - SS George Washington, circa 1926

  • Jan13

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    Looking for Julia Connors' murderer, Police posted messages at a movie house in 1912While helping a friend find some records for her family, I learned of the terrible murder of Julia Connors in the Bronx in 1912.

    The horrific story was one that not only took over the New York area, but from the large number of newspaper reports found over at Chronicling America in 1912, it spread across the country.

    I do not wish to go into the details of the murder, and while it didn’t need any additional outrage to remain in the public’s eye, the case was fueled on by the facts that a local girl lied to the police about witnessing her that day and also by the subsequent suicide of her murderer.

    But, one thing I found intriguing was the piece of reporting at right, taken from The Evening World, July 9, 1912 edition.

    In the center of the long and detailed article, they reported: Read More | Comments