• Newspaper
  • Oct13

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    The Genealogical Bug Busy
    The sun. (New York [N.Y.]), 16 Aug. 1908. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers.
    Lib. of Congress.

  • Apr8

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    I am only a couple of generations removed from my Irish immigrants to the United States, so my own direct Irish ancestors were not here during the American Revolution.
    But, while scanning Chronicling America for interesting things, I happened upon a 1919 newspaper article in The Sun entitled Irishmen In Our Revolution, which is a review of Michael J. O’Brien’s (then) new book A Hidden Phase of American History.

    Irishmen In Our Revolution
    The review itself is an interesting read from a historical perspective – both the role the Irish played in The Revolution, and the 1919 perspective of it all.

    However, perhaps more interesting than this to those researching their Irish family that may have been in America that early is that the book itself has an Appendix entitled Officers of the American Army and Navy of the Revolution of Irish Birth or Descent – with a very long list of names and assignments. And a bonus: he has marked all of those born in Ireland with an asterisk. You can find a full copy of Irishmen In Our Revolution over on The Google Books.

    Who could asterisk for anything more?

  • Apr5

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    …and, posting this solely in the name of interesting fun:

    Found on Brooklyn Public Library powered by Newspapers.com

  • Mar30

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    According to the Brief History of World War Two Advertising Campaigns War Loans and Bonds:

    On May 1, 1941, the first Series E U.S. Savings Bond was sold to President Franklin D. Roosevelt by Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau. On January 3, 1946, the last proceeds from the Victory Bond campaign were deposited to the Treasury. The War Finance Committees, in charge of the loan drives, sold a total of $185.7 billion of securities. This incredible mass selling achievement (for helping to finance the war) has not been matched, before or since. By the end of World War II, over 85 million Americans had invested in War Bonds, a number unmatched by any other country.

    There were eight War Loan drives in total –

    June 12, 1944 marked the beginning of the most ambitious war financing campaign. The $16 billion goal of the Fifth War Loan was the largest of the eight, but by its conclusion on July 8, 1944, $20.6 billion had been sold. It came at a critical time, as the tempo of war had increased dramatically. Production rates were hitting new peaks, while availability of goods was low and consumer earning rates were high. An estimated $42.7 worth of advertising was contributed towards the loan campaign, which served to thwart inflation as well as to finance the war.

    With such an ambitious goal and over $16.7 billion raised in the previous four ward bond drives, they must have realized they needed some serious tactics for getting people to pony up more money for the war.

    Reading through some Queens newspapers today, I happened upon an advertisement by a partnership of Gertz Department Store and Textron to sell war bonds with a decidedly unique slant: When you buy the bond, you can fill out a note directly to Hitler or Tojo and they’ll insure it gets shipped overseas and inserted in a live bomb!

    Now THERE’S some bang for your buck!

    Put Your Name on An Invasion Bomb Ad.21.JUN.1944.LI Daily Press.Page04

  • Mar5

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    I’ve been searching about to see if I could find some additional background for my great-grandfather Michael Tierney’s service in the New York City Police’s 25th Precinct.

    In an older post, Michael Tierney – Policeman, Part 2, I mention my truly serendipitous find of a photo of a group of policemen standing in front of the newly opened 25th Precinct, with great-grandfather Michael included.

    Article: The Finest Station HouseBeing your average man on the job, there isn’t too much specifically attributable to him in the newspapers. There are a few possible articles mentioning either an “Officer Tierney” or even “Michael Tierney”, but still hard to tie to him.

    So, with plans to write something with a bit of background in hand, I’ve also been looking for information on his precinct, the police force in general, and the city at the time between 1885 to 1913.

    Today I found this short, but sweet, description of the new 25th Precinct from the November 30, 1887 edition of the New York Times. In addition to a nice description of the facilities, it also offers information on an expansion of the precinct territory at the time. Read More | Comments