• New York
  • Jun21

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    Sorry, couldn’t resist the lithp joke – I wanted to post a favorite photo and on Thursdays past I’ve called them “Thilent Thursday” posts in an obvious hat-tip to Wordless Wednesday of many bloggerists.

    Toddler Mike Tierney, about 1929. But then I had a better idea.

    Or a worse one, depending on your perthpective.

    So, moving on. A favorite photo of my Dad as a toddler in a sailor-looking suit, about 1929, probably in Jamaica, Queens, NY.

    Mike Tierney, Navy Portrait, WWIIFunnily enough, he joined the US Navy in World War II.

  • May28

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    I have been on the trail of trying to find a lost Aunt in my family for several years. She was my grandmother’s daughter, born in Ireland and likely emigrated to New York as a teenager, many years after my Gran did.

    I have a much longer post in the making on this search and some possible good fortune – but I am in need of some help with one thing. I have not been able to discern what the handwriting says over the typewritten information on the following image.

    Lizzie Jennings Ellis Island record - handwriting in question

    Click to Enlarge.


    Does anyone out there have an idea of what it might be? Some quick context: this is a possible record for the Aunt I am seeking, and this part of the emigration lists the name and address of the person she is joining in the US.

    I have not found the “Father, Thomas Jennings” in question in NY at the time in censuses, directories, etc. BUT, this address is where my Gran lived in the 1920 census. No evidence of anyone named Jennings living at that location found yet.

    I am not sure the text handwritten in is anything special, but I am not getting anything from it but the initial “D…” and probably the second word is “to.” I’m wondering if it might be some common notation other researchers might recognize right off the bat.

    The original record on the Ellis Island site can be found here.

  • Mar5

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    I’ve been searching about to see if I could find some additional background for my great-grandfather Michael Tierney’s service in the New York City Police’s 25th Precinct.

    In an older post, Michael Tierney – Policeman, Part 2, I mention my truly serendipitous find of a photo of a group of policemen standing in front of the newly opened 25th Precinct, with great-grandfather Michael included.

    Article: The Finest Station HouseBeing your average man on the job, there isn’t too much specifically attributable to him in the newspapers. There are a few possible articles mentioning either an “Officer Tierney” or even “Michael Tierney”, but still hard to tie to him.

    So, with plans to write something with a bit of background in hand, I’ve also been looking for information on his precinct, the police force in general, and the city at the time between 1885 to 1913.

    Today I found this short, but sweet, description of the new 25th Precinct from the November 30, 1887 edition of the New York Times. In addition to a nice description of the facilities, it also offers information on an expansion of the precinct territory at the time. Read More | Comments

  • Feb5

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    Horse Drawn Carriage Driver's LicenseAt right is my grandfather Joseph Vanac’s NYPD “Traffic Warning Card” for a a “Horse Drawn” vehicle, circa 1922.

    I am happy to report that Grandpa had a clean driving record. Not sure how clean the horse was on the streets, though.

    Calvary Cemetery, Queens, NY
    In the 1920 census he lived near the Queens cemeteries where he worked as a stone mason. His entire enumeration district contained only two pages – probably hundreds of times more people buried in that area at the time than lived there. Also: horses.

    (Photo source: Wikimedia Commons.)

  • Nov21

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    In a previous post entitled WWI Army Pay Card I spoke about using the veteran burial record for my great uncle to find his Army Serial Number (ASN). I used that info to finally successfully order his WWI records from the National Archives.

    The source I used was the U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962 database on Ancestry.com. Great uncle Michael died in 1936, so I was very glad when that database went online- I had every other piece of information on Michael short of his ASN and his shoe size, but NARA kept replying to my records requests with “not enough info.”

    Just a month or so later, a researcher in Ireland contacted me about my grandfather’s first wife, Sabina Gilroy, whom he found in my tree. This cousin of my cousins has shared a great deal on a part of our tree that was bereft, which has been wonderful.

    It turns out Sabina’s brother Michael was also a WWI veteran, but he died in service a few weeks before the war ended.

    So, you’d think the Interment Control Forms database would be out since he died 10 years before 1928, no?

    No. It turns out that groups of veterans were disinterred from their original burial places overseas and reburied back in the US.

    Michael Gilroy was moved from a cemetery near the battle in Meuse-Argonne back to Cypress Hills Cemetery in Brooklyn some time after 1928.

    So, now we have his interment card, his ASN and a way to now find his records at NARA.

    National Veteran's Cemetery Interment Card for Michael Gilroy