• Sep25

    I have been helping a friend lately by looking to see what I could put together for her family tree. Luckily for her, almost immediately a torrent of records began to pour from the online coffers, so the tree began to fill up quite nicely.

    As is often the case, there are a few records that may be for parallel persons of similar name, so definitely some work to do on locking those down as properly vetted and assessed.

    XBut, in the short run I found an interesting thing: both her great grandfather, and his father both seemed to have served in the Fighting 69th volunteer infantry – although the elder was before the Civil War, and the younger in World War I.

    While looking at information for what appears to be the younger Francis Kearney’s stay in a a “National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers”, I found something slightly puzzling.

    His history at the home lists him as being “Admitted” on May 4, 1925, and then on Oct 31, 1926 his Cause of Discharge is “Dropped.”

    Francis Kearney Military Home Record DetailThe images for these records come in pairs of pages, and I quickly noticed that the next fellow’s record has many entries for “Discharged” and “Transferred”.

    Anyone out there in the genealogosphere have any knowledge on the term “Dropped” in this context? Hmm.

    Record Citation:

    “United States National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866-1938,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-21051-37678-11?cc=1916230&wc=MMRT-VYX:n30335972 : accessed 25 Sep 2013), Togus, Maine > Register no. 18000-19499 > image 262 of 771.

  • Sep25

    A site well-known to genealogists has this dandy message about cookies that pops up across the top of one’s screen. Over. and over. and over. and over.

    I finally took a minute to look into it, and seems someone from their support forum helpfully mentioned to another (un-)interested party that when one’s browser has the “do not track” setting enabled, there is no way to stop the cookie message.

    She also suggested that their developers “would love to her feedback regarding this banner.”

    I have sent them the following message/request, and am also posting it here in a stand of anti-cookie message on all sites. LET US STAND TOGETHER AND EAT ALL THE COOKIES.

    Feedback message:

    Over the last few months I’ve found the “cookie warning” at the top of the page comes back over and over and is terrifically annoying. I see in the online support forum that someone said it is related to the “do not track” browser setting and that there is no way to stop the message if that setting is enabled.

    They also mentioned that the Developers would love to hear feedback, so here’s mine:

    1. Do Not Track is enabled because I want it to be.
    2. Every site and their grandmother’s site on the Internet uses cookies. It is a staple of the Internet diet.
    If someone doesn’t already know this, then the message is only going to confuse them – “Wait WHAT? THEY ARE TRACKING ME” the more uninformed paranoid might say. I doubt any of the uninformed are saying “Oh, They’re tracking me – GREAT I WAS LONELY.”

    If some crazy legal thing has occurred that is making such a message necessary, I would have to say there is probably a better way to implement it. I do not have this problem on any other site – when I do see cookie messages, they are always one-off’s, at least until I clear my browser cache. Which of course, ironically, clears out one’s cookies.

    So, Dear Developers,
    Please make the cookie message go away. Or at least send me some real cookies. Chocolate chip. no nuts.
    thx.
    .JT.

  • Sep12

    For those researching family in Ireland, the book Illustrations, Historical and Genealogical of King James’s Irish Army List, 1689 might be useful in your trek back in time. (In an 1861 updated second edition, by John D’Alton.)

    The AskAboutIreland site says of the work:

    The work contains a vast wealth of family history, including information outlining the lineage, honours and achievements of families connected with Ireland, either through birth, rank, title or alliance. As many of the sources used in compiling the two volumes are now lost they stand as a highly valuable tool for Irish family research.

    Visit their site for a bit more description of the content and links to PDF versions of the two volumes.

    You can also find variously formatted versions of the books on Archive.org. Click here for one version although the header pages differ from the Ask About Ireland versions, so I’m unsure if they are earlier versions or some other form.

    But, the Archive.org version does have searchable text formats, so you can look for the surnames you hope to find more easily…

  • Sep11

    I visited the NYC Police Museum a few years ago when my son was about 7 years old. He was very interested in the 9/11 exhibit there, but was tough talking with him about it.

    Our thoughts are with all that were lost 12 years ago.

    Son at 9/11 Exhibit at NYC Police Museum, 2010
    The Old Slip police station, N... Digital ID: 120399. New York Public Library

    That museum is a great one to visit – the exhibits are well done and it is located in the Old Slip police station near the South Street Seaport. Sadly, it has been closed since Hurricane Sandy – hopefully it will open again soon.

    Thanks to the NY Public Library “The Pageant of America” Collection for the image of the Old Slip Police Station.

  • Sep10

    Hello, Fax!

    Posted in: Technology

    After several years of intermittent tracking down possibly related Tierney family records, I have not really gotten anywhere with transcription-type records from sites like Roots Ireland.

    Ce n'est pas ma famille.

    Ce n’est pas ma famille.


    I have little to go on in Ireland for that part of the tree. While Tierney is not too bad a surname to search for in the scheme of things, they are hide and seek champions. Also, my related McDonald and Murphy lines are really giving me a run for my money.

    And, after many attempts at triangulating relevant records on Roots Ireland, the money is running out.

    If you don’t have time for the long version of this story, feel free to scroll down to the tool tip section below…

    So, I’ve decided to start a different tactic – Instead of fussing with “credits” and the resulting, resounding sounds of  “ARGH!” rolling down my street as I realize I have purchased yet another completely unrelated transcription record, I will be ordering photocopy versions of original records directly from GRO Ireland at €4. a pop.

    While there might not be too much of a savings involved in this change, I will at least have original documents to look at and will avoid relying on possibly mis-transcribed records. That will make me feel a bit better at least. So will chocolate chip cookies.

    (To make sure I have the hang of the ordering process first I will start by tightening up the old tree by ordering original certificates for my relatively well-known Egan & Farrell lines near Ferbane in Kings County.)

    If you would like a quick primer on how to order certificates from GRO Ireland, visit their Apply For Certificates page. Of course, you’ll probably want to use the Civil Registration Indexes (1845-1958) on Familysearch to look for possible records to purchase first.

    Tool Tip – Hello Fax!

    Now, with all of that background out of the way – to the real purpose of this post: As I filled out the GRO order form, my Oxymoronic Genealogical Impatience™ quickly kicked in when I noticed that you can fax certificate applications into the GRO. Forget that crazy old postal mail thing. That’s 20th century stuff, man. FAXING – THAT’S WHERE IT’S AT.

    However, I do not own a fax machine at home any longer, and I can’t really start faxing Ireland from my company systems at lunch. (Well, I could, but you know, I’m the IT Director and that really wouldn’t be a good idea.)

    Then I found that hello fax is offering a deal if you sign up with your Google account -

    In honor of our launch, get 50 free fax pages / month & unlimited e-signatures

    Within 5 minutes of creating the account I had sent off my first few certificate orders to GRO Ireland.

    In addition to Google Drive, you can also integrate the service with other commonly used services – not a bad deal for free. The only thing that is not entirely clear is how long the 50 free pages/month will last – we’ll see!

    Hello Fax Integrations